What to Consider as Your Workforce Ages

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What to Consider as Your Workforce Ages

Workers with knowledge and expertise are some of your most important resources. But since those valuable qualities usually come only after years of experience, some of your workers will have safety and health requirements and even additional stressors that differ from those of the fresh-faced newbies who need their guidance. So think ahead and be ready to offer ideas to help veteran workers do their jobs.
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By M.B. Sutherland, Sr. Copywriter, Magid

Workers with knowledge and expertise are some of your most important resources. But since those valuable qualities usually come only after years of experience, some of your workers will have safety and health requirements and even additional stressors that differ from those of the fresh-faced newbies who need their guidance. So think ahead and be ready to offer ideas to help veteran workers do their jobs.

Eye Care

Eye Care

  • Offer display screens with larger monitors throughout your facility for workers who may not always have reading glasses handy.
  • Provide prescription safety eyewear to ensure that your people can see clearly while keeping their eyes protected.

Fatigue

Fatigue

  • Promote periodic 5 minute breaks so workers can sit, stand and stretch, stay hydrated, or take a few minutes to clear their minds and ensure they’re working safely.

Ergonomics

Ergonomics

  • Design workstations to avoid aches and pains by using ergonomic floor mats, chairs, and mouse pads, which can be helpful for both experienced and younger workers.
  • Institute an ergonomic training program to help everyone avoid posture, strain, and repetitive motion injuries.

Hearing

Hearing

  • Offer headsets to improve noise attenuation and sound quality, particularly in noisy work environments.

New Technologies & Training

New Technologies & Training

  • Make sure veterans stay up to date on new software and technologies.
  • Offer training for all workers on different job functions so veterans have the option to switch to a less physically demanding job if needed. This keeps them happy and healthy and allows you to keep the benefit of their knowledge.

Ask for Input

Ask for Input

Accommodating multiple generations may present some new challenges to safety managers, but the combination of experienced veterans and energized younger workers can provide a huge value to both your company and your safety program. Once you’ve evaluated all of these options, be sure to ask your workers what changes might help them do their jobs better.