Safety Matters™ Resource Center

Loading...

Safety Training

See All

Download Fun Safety Training Videos for Your Employees

Keep the safety lessons you taught in the classroom top-of-mind for your workers with short, 30 to 60-second safety reminder videos! Unlock these brief safety lessons to loop in your breakroom or to play at your toolbox talks. You can even send them to your workers’ phones for a quick reminder before a shift begins.
Read More

Keep the safety lessons you taught in the classroom top-of-mind for your workers with short, 30 to 60-second safety reminder videos! Unlock these brief safety lessons to loop in your breakroom or to play at your toolbox talks. You can even send them to your workers’ phones for a quick reminder before a shift begins.

Image of preventing illness safety training video

The Costs of an Eye Injury

Help your workers understand the personal costs of an eye injury and how to avoid becoming a statistic!

Image of wearing ppe correctly safety training video

Wearing PPE Correctly

Keep workers from spreading bad PPE habits with this quick reminder to wear their PPE correctly.

Image of ladder safety training video

Ladder Safety Tips

Don’t let your workers become a statistic! Give them these 5 tips for ladder safety.

Image of proper earplug insertion safety training video

Proper Earplug Insertion

Magid’s Fairy Ear Mother will be a sight your workers will remember – along with how to properly insert their ear plugs for safety!

Image of protective clothing for extreme temperatures safety training video

Protective Clothing for Extreme Environments

Remind your workers that they can’t cut corners on safety to get comfortable.

Image of preventing cuts and lacerations safety training video

Avoiding Cuts & Lacerations

Give your workers these 5 quick tips for preventing cuts and lacerations on the job.

Image of the ripple effect safety training video

The Ripple Effect

Help everyone understand that the injury they’re risking affects everyone!

Image of walking like a penguin safety training video

Walk Like a Penguin

Demonstrate the safest way to walk across snow and ice.

Image of preventing hypothermia safety training video

Preventing Hypothermia

Keep your workers safe and warm this winter with these quick tips to prevent hypothermia!

Image of when to replace your work gloves safety training video

When to Replace Your Work Gloves

Help your people know when to replace a worn glove, when to launder it, and when a glove is safe to continue use.

Image of thicker gloves versus thinner glove protection safety training video

Does a Thicker Glove Protect Better?

Show your workers when a knit glove beats a plain leather driver.

Image of impact glove safety training video

When do You Need an Impact Glove?

Educate your employees on the proper uses of impact gloves.

Image of preventing illness safety training video
Preventing Heat Illness

Make sure your workers are staying safe and hydrated with these tips to avoid heat illness on the job.

Image of preventing illness safety training video
Preventing Heat Illness

Make sure your workers are staying safe and hydrated with these tips to avoid heat illness on the job.

Image of preventing illness safety training video
Working From Heights

Teach your workers to inspect their fall protection equipment before and after use and how to stay safe while working at a height.



Shadow

Fill out the form below to unlock these handy microlearning videos:

Download Ready-to-Use Safety Training Presentations

As a manufacturer with workers of our own, we understand that training keeps safety top of mind for your people. We also understand how time consuming it can be to put these classes together, so we did it for you! Unlock these helpful safety training presentations and start using them today.
Read More

As a manufacturer with workers of our own, we understand that training keeps safety top of mind for your people. We also understand how time consuming it can be to put these classes together, so we did it for you! Unlock these helpful safety training presentations and start using them today.

Hearing Protection Safety Training

28 Slides + Presentation Notes (.pptx)

This training helps workers to understand how exposure to loud noise can negatively affect their hearing, even if they think their hearing is excellent.

This presentation includes:

  • Guided discussions about hearing loss statistics and the amount of time workers should operate in loud work environments.
  • A fun safety training video to show workers how to properly insert formable and pre-molded ear plugs.
  • Tips for how workers can protect their hearing through different methods on as well as off the job.
  • “Test Your Knowledge” quiz questions regarding different types of hearing protection, OSHA regulations, and hearing impairment conditions.

 

Working from Heights Safety Training

32 Slides + Presentation Notes (.pptx)

Teach your workers about common fall restraint and arrest systems, how to calculate fall clearance, and what their first line of defense is to protect them in the event of a fall.

This presentation includes:

  • How to inspect and understand fall protection safety equipment
  • Safety training videos to show workers how to don safety harnesses and safely work around fall hazards
  • Guided discussions about fall hazards employees encounter during their shift
  • Hands-on teaching activities to show what to do in the event of an emergency
  • “Test Your Knowledge” activities to test your workers’ memory of safe practices

 

Eye Protection Safety Training

32 Slides + Presentation Notes (.pptx)

Teach your workers about the most common eye injuries, the differences between kinds of protective eyewear, and the proper ways to treat eye injuries.

This presentation includes:

  • Guided discussions about eye safety hazards and eyewear workers may use in your facility
  • A fun safety training video to show workers the easiest ways to protect their eyes
  • Interactive activities to help workers think about how they need to respond to eye injuries in the workplace
  • Quiz questions regarding eye injury statistics and eyewear varieties discussed in the training

 

Heat Illness Prevention Training

22 Slides + Presentation Notes (.pptx)

This training teaches your workers the differences between common heat illnesses like heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke and offers easy to understand steps for prevention and treatment.

This presentation includes:

  • Common signs, symptoms, and treatment options to help workers recognize common heat illnesses
  • Useful charts and infographics to clearly explain heat stress awareness concepts
  • Tips and advice to help workers keep themselves and others safe
  • “Test your Knowledge” questions to make workers think about the information they have learned in the presentation and how it applies to your jobsite

 

Forklift Safety Training

22 Slides + Presentation Notes (.pptx)

Utilize this presentation to remind your workers about forklift safety basics including loading and setting down freight, turning in tight corners, and driving on inclines and declines.

This presentation includes:

  • Guided discussions on the most important aspects of forklift safety inspections and operation
  • Explanations and procedures for recognizing and avoiding the most common forklift accidents
  • “Test Your Knowledge” quizzes regarding worker safety and the safety of the vehicle

 

Wearing PPE Correctly Training

23 Slides + Presentation Notes (.pptx)

This training helps workers understand how easily bad safety habits can spread and shows them how to wear common PPE correctly!

This presentation includes:

  • Exercises that explore what workers may have noticed in your facility
  • Discussion ideas to get workers to understand what is the right way to wear PPE
  • Wrong vs. Right pictures showing PPE that is commonly worn wrong and how to wear it right
  • A hands-on exercise that lets your workers try on the PPE you use in your facility
  • A quiz that tests what they learned and what they still need to practice

 

Slips, Trips & Falls Training

18 Slides + Presentation Notes (.pptx)

Help your workers understand the seriousness of these types of accidents that make up almost 20% of job-related injuries.

This presentation includes:

  • The primary causes of slips, trips, and falls
  • Advice on prevention
  • “What’s Wrong with this Picture?” tips
  • An interactive “Find the Hazard” challenge

 

Preventing Cuts & Lacerations Training

17 Slides + Presentation Notes (.pptx)

This presentation reminds workers how cut and laceration accidents can affect their lives and discusses prevention both in how they do their jobs and in how they wear and maintain their PPE.

This presentation includes:

  • Safety tips that allow times to talk about specific hazards in your own environment
  • An interactive “What’s Wrong with this Picture” activity that helps your people to practice spotting risks and thinking ahead before an accident happens

 

Ladder Safety Training

26 Slides + Presentation Notes (.pptx)

Help your workers understand the most common reasons for ladder accidents, proper ladder use, and important ladder maintenance and preparation tips.

This presentation includes:

  • Interactive activities to teach workers about ladder safety and different kinds of ladders they may need on the job
  • “What’s Wrong with this Picture” activities to point out safety hazards
  • “Test Your Knowledge” quizzes regarding ladder preparation, maintenance, and conduct

 

Shadow

Fill out the form below to unlock these handy presentations:

Making the Most of your Safety Reminders

Safety training isn’t a one-and-done event. It’s a dynamic and constant process of reminding workers about previous lessons and pointing out new hazards that may appear on the job. A network of safety reminders that use different methods of communication is the best way to keep safety on every worker’s mind.
Read More

By John Heniff, Content Copywriter, Magid

Safety training isn’t a one-and-done event. It’s a dynamic and constant process of reminding workers about previous lessons and pointing out new hazards that may appear on the job. A network of safety reminders that use different methods of communication is the best way to keep safety on every worker’s mind.

Shadow

Use these tips to reinforce your safety messages!

1. Conduct Both Announced and Unannounced Safety Inspections

Your everyday coaching is a good opportunity for spontaneous correction and praise. But it can be just as important to do announced observances as well. If your workers know that they’re about to be evaluated, they may review their safety rules and discover they haven’t been doing all they should, creating a valuable learning opportunity. Additionally, watching workers doing their job in what they believe is the safest way can give you crucial information about where they need more training.

2. Rotate Safety Reminders

Your workers may be aware of safety reminder posters you have posted around your workplace. But if they see them in the same location every day, over time your reminders will start to blend into the landscape. Make a schedule to rearrange posters once a month or even once a week to keep reminders visible and on your workers’ minds.

3. Bring in Outside Experts

Think about inviting a safety professional, physical therapist, or athletic trainer to talk to your workers. You can bring them in during training or toolbox talks to go over specific topics such as utilizing better ergonomics or showcasing the differences between different kinds of safety equipment. Sometimes a special event with an unfamiliar face can make lessons more memorable.

4. Have your Workers Enforce Safety Reminders

If your workers are inspired to think constantly about their own safety as well as that of their teammates, they can serve as a second set of eyes and ears at your worksite for safety hazards. Encouraging everyone to make team safety their business helps your company maintain a vibrant and supportive safety culture even in your absence.

5. Empower and Reward your Workers

Use the power of empowerment to reward workers who keep themselves and their coworkers safe. Whether they’re reminding their teammates to be safe, actively mentoring new workers or bringing safety hazards to your attention, you can recognize them for their efforts and reward them with perks like gift cards, vacation days, or better parking spots to create a precedent for positive reinforcement in the future.

Get FREE posters to work into your rotation!

Fall Protection Plan | Safeguard Workers Against Falls from Heights

Falls are one of the most common accidents on the job. One wrong step can mean serious injury or even death from just a few feet above a lower level. In 2018 alone, 52,510 workers were injured in falls to a lower level and 615 workers died because of similar falls. And the truth is, none of those accidents had to happen. You can keep your workers safe at a height with a few easy steps.
Read More

By John Heniff, Content Copywriter, Magid

Falls are one of the most common accidents on the job. One wrong step can mean serious injury or even death from just a few feet above a lower level. In 2018 alone, 52,510 workers were injured in falls to a lower level and 615 workers died because of similar falls. And the truth is, none of those accidents had to happen. You can keep your workers safe at a height with a few easy steps.

Shadow

Select the Best Fall Protection for Your Workers

You know your worksite better than anyone, but be sure you consider appropriate fall protection whenever the work changes. If your workers are transitioning to a new project involving working at heights, consider whether enhancements to their fall protection system or additional training may be necessary.

Teach Your Workers About Fall Protection

Once you have the tools, give your workers the information they need to stay safe.

  • Use different kinds of teaching methods to create unique training activities during safety presentations. It’s one thing to explain why workers should keep a clean workspace, but it’s another to create an activity where workers spot hazards to understand the necessity of a clean workspace at a height.
  • Send fun safety videos to your workers after trainings to keep them thinking about specific topics like guidelines for working near safety nets.
  • Place safety posters in high-traffic areas of your workplace to promote smart safety practices when you’re not on site.

In addition to your regular toolbox talks, consider an additional tailgate meeting before workers go up to an elevated jobsite. Taking this time gives you an additional opportunity to offer safety tips and ask for questions from workers.

Remind Your Workers Regularly about Common Sense Safety Rules

With so many regulations to keep track of and so much on the line, reminders are especially important when working at heights. While many reminders take place in person, you can also send workers just-in-time safety reminder lessons if you notice someone forgetting to inspect their safety harness or cutting corners in any way. You can also double-down on common sense safety lessons:

  • Teach your workers that their sense of balance is their first line of defense, even when using different kinds of fall protection. Working at a height can cause some workers to feel anxious and move more cautiously than they would on the ground, so reminding them about minding their balance can help them move and work more confidently.
  • Provide hi-vis PPE so they can easily see where their teammates are at all times.
  • Offer slip-resistant footwear to minimize the risk of slipping and falling.
  • Advocate keeping workstations and walkways neat and clear so work areas are free from tripping hazards.
  • Enforce guidelines for walking within walkway limits and using railings when available.
  • Have workers begin projects at ground-level so they can perform fewer tasks at a height.
  • Most of all, encourage workers to report any hazards they see so they can keep themselves and their coworkers safe.

Stock up on FREE safety trainings to teach your workers about slips, trips, and falls from different kinds of heights.

 

Safety Culture

See All

5 Ways to Deal with Opioid Use in the Workplace

Opioids can provide short-term pain relief for chronic medical conditions. But when used incorrectly, they can ruin lives.
Read More

By John Heniff, Content Copywriter, Magid

 

Opioids can provide short-term pain relief for chronic medical conditions. But when used incorrectly, they can ruin lives.

Opioid overdoses killed more than 47,000 people in 2017. 2/3 of those struggling with Opioid Use Disorder are currently in the workforce.

Opioid use can impair a user’s thought process and reaction time while on the job. In the best case, that can simply cause a drop-off in productivity. But at its worst, it can lead to accidents and injuries to your worker or to anyone else on the job.

This increasing epidemic can seem overwhelming for safety managers, but there are some things you can do to help.

Shadow

Here are 5 actions you can take to help deal with opioids in your workplace:

Examine your Healthcare Policies

Opioid misuse often begins with an injury. Does your company offer ample medical leave and disability for injured workers? Employees struggling to go back to work while they’re still in pain are more likely to end up with a substance use disorder. Talk to your HR Department about this and ask if they can provide counseling services, health fairs, or other avenues to encourage good health for workers and their families. If your company doesn’t have a program to help addicted workers, now is the time to suggest they start one!

Implement an Anonymous Drug Disposal Program

Opioids are meant to be used on a short-term basis. Implementing a drug disposal program in your workplace can help employees resist the temptation to keep leftover medication “just in case” they have pain in the future. They can also help to keep unused or expired medications from getting into the wrong hands like children or spouses. You can set up drug disposal programs with collection methods like disposal receptacles at your workplace or with mail-back envelopes specifically designed for prescription medications.

Reverse the Stigma of Opioid Use Disorder

Use your safety meetings, toolbox talks, and one-on-one time to cultivate an environment where workers can discuss opioids or addiction without judgment or shame. Tell your employees to vocalize concerns about opioids they’ve been prescribed and how they may interfere with performing their jobs. Encouraging everyone to see Opioid Use Disorder as an illness instead of a character flaw can make people more comfortable speaking up.

Educate Workers on Pain Management

Encourage workers with chronic pain to ask their doctor about alternative methods to alleviate pain. Depending on their condition, something other than an opioid might be helpful. That may include:

  • Acupuncture
  • Massage
  • Epidurals
  • Nerve Blocks
  • Joint Injections
  • Non-opioid Pain Medication
  • Physical Therapy
  • Yoga

Let them know it’s okay to question their doctor about the safety of any prescription.

Emphasize Ergonomics to Prevent Potential Injuries

Finally, make sure your workers are mindful of tasks than can cause strains and soreness to help reduce their likelihood of developing chronic pain. Reduce pain points and highlight accident prevention to help them recognize ways they can protect their joints and extremities while performing particularly taxing jobs.

You can’t help everyone, but good communication and smart, compassionate policies and procedures can keep more of your workers healthy both on and off the job.

Shadow

Do you have a tip for other safety managers on how to handle opioid use at your workplace? Share it on our Safety Managers’ Secrets page!

Fill out the form below to watch this free webinar.

 
Image of webinar cover

Whether you’re an essential business or a company in the first stages of reopening, COVID-19 is a concern that’s not going away anytime soon. It’s a matter of when, not if, some of your workers catch the virus—and you need to be sure your plans are agile enough to keep production running. As a PPE manufacturer and distributor, Magid has practical, actionable advice from the front lines that will help you keep your workers safer. 00:53:41 (.mp4)

 

Fill out the form below to access the webinar:

Six Ways to Reduce Work Stress for Safety Managers

It’s hard to build a safety culture when you’re tearing your hair out. Being responsible for the safety of your employees is a huge job in the best of times. Add in a pandemic along with a struggling economy and your stress level may be off the charts. Cuts and lacerations, arc-flash, slips, trips, and falls – all the hazards you normally deal with are still part of the job, but now you need masks and social distancing guidelines, too. How can you keep your sanity with all you have to do? Try these six tips!
Read More

By John Heniff, Content Copywriter, Magid

It’s hard to build a safety culture when you’re tearing your hair out. Being responsible for the safety of your employees is a huge job in the best of times. Add in a pandemic along with a struggling economy and your stress level may be off the charts. Cuts and lacerations, arc-flash, slips, trips, and falls – all the hazards you normally deal with are still part of the job, but now you need masks and social distancing guidelines, too. How can you keep your sanity with all you have to do? Try these six tips!

Shadow

Stress Relievers to Make Your Job Easier

1. Plan Time to Plan

No matter what else is going on in the world, your company’s leaders expect production as usual and your customers are still looking to get their orders filled. That doesn’t mean you have to start putting out fires the moment you arrive for the day. Take ten minutes first thing in the morning to clear your head and organize and plan your schedule for the day or even for the week. Use digital calendars and planner apps to keep you organized and block out time when you need it. There’s nothing wrong with a planning meeting you schedule with yourself!

2. Reassess Your Routines and Schedules

Time is the biggest constraint for most safety managers. Carve out some time to audit your work schedules and daily routines to find inefficiencies. Although reworking larger operations can be a massive investment of time and energy, making smaller changes can be a fast and easy way to cut out redundant tasks and find opportunities to delegate.

3. Delegate Tasks to your People

You can’t do it all yourself. Delegating tasks to some of your best employees will free up your time and give you more breathing room in your busy schedule. Your safety committee is a good place to find enthusiastic employees who want to make your workplace safer and perhaps even move up the ladder to take on more responsibility. Find your safety leaders and leverage them to reduce your own stress!

Shadow

Stress Relievers to Take Care of Yourself

4. Monitor your Stressors

Never forget that you’re just as human as your employees! Chronic stress can lead to symptoms like anxiety and high blood pressure as well as unhealthy coping habits like overeating. If you recognize situations that cause stress symptoms like headaches, stomachaches, anger, or frustration, take a moment to consciously note what set that stress in motion. Over time, you may be able to recognize these stressors when they occur so you can figure out how to change what’s causing them. For example, if you find yourself stressing every time you need to remind employees to wear their safety glasses, you can think about implementing new mentoring or training programs or even posting more safety reminders to take some of the pressure off of you.

5. Give Yourself a Break

When you feel the stress building, take a moment to step back and re-center your focus. Get up and stretch or walk around to get your blood flowing and switch your focus for a short while. Even closing your eyes and concentrating on your breathing for a few moments can slow your heartbeat and stabilize your blood pressure to help you think more clearly when you return to the task at hand.

6. Establish Boundaries

Establish boundaries to start or end your day on a controlled, focused note. Listen to music, your favorite sports radio, or a book on tape during your commute instead of thinking about work. After work, avoid checking your phone during dinner or family time so you can maintain a firm barrier between your work life and your home life, when possible.

Save yourself some time with our FREE,
ready-to-download safety training resources!

How to Keep Workers Motivated in Tough Times

It can be a challenge to keep people motivated and productive in the best of times, but keeping employees energized and working safely takes even more effort during a crisis. It’s natural for managers to ask people to pull together, but you can make that more likely by digging down to understand human motivation.
Read More

By M.B. Sutherland, Sr. Copywriter, Magid

It can be a challenge to keep people motivated and productive in the best of times, but keeping employees energized and working safely takes even more effort during a crisis. It’s natural for managers to ask people to pull together, but you can make that more likely by digging down to understand human motivation.

What Motivates People?

A recent Harvard Business School article identified four basic drives that motivate most of us. The drive to:

  • Acquire – to get things they need and want
  • Bond – to feel they’re part of a community
  • Comprehend – to understand their circumstances and options
  • Defend – to keep what’s theirs

The more you fill these four basic (ABCD) needs, the better your chance of upping your team’s motivation.

icon of a hand with money

Acquire—Offer Extra Compensation in Tough Times

We all need the basics of survival. In our society, that usually means we need money. Many companies have offered extra hazard pay for workers in the pandemic, but not every manager has that option. Even if you can’t give a paycheck boost, you can still provide incentives to help people feel motivated and appreciated.

  • Give Small Rewards – offer small gestures like a cool-looking pair of safety glasses for every worker, or a box of disposable masks to take home for their family’s use.
  • Add Paid Time – double up on paid break times once a week to give people a few extra minutes to gather their thoughts or step outside for some air.
  • Offer Special Treats – hold Free-Lunch-Friday once a month with a special meal to show your appreciation or bring in bagels or donuts to start the day.
  • Get Creative – find inexpensive ways that add a little fun like handing out lottery tickets to the first few people to arrive for the day to see if someone gets lucky.

Whatever you decide to offer can satisfy people’s need to get extra compensation for extra effort – even if that effort is just showing up for work during a crisis.

icon of electronics

Bond—Increase (Safe) Togetherness

The pandemic has made it harder than ever to keep a sense of community as we’ve been forced to limit our social interactions, cover our faces, and stand six feet away when we interact. But there are ways you can compensate to try to keep your facility or jobsite as normal as possible.

  • Keep Holding Toolbox Talks – the need for social distancing may make you consider holding fewer gatherings. But these meetings serve a vital purpose in issuing safety reminders, making sure everyone understands the day’s plans, and giving people an opportunity to ask questions. Even if you need to shrink your meetings or have people spread out across the job floor while you amplify your voice, you may still be able to gather as a group and give everyone a chance to lay eyes on each other.
  • Increase One-on-One Time – take some time to check in with as many employees as possible to see how they’re coping. Schedule a socially distanced break or lunch with a different person each day or once a week. Take the time to find out how the pandemic is affecting them and their families.
  • Take Advantage of Electronics – with a cell phone in every pocket, you may be able to start your team’s day by sending a text or email with a safety reminder or even just a quick motivational message. Hold safety meetings via phone-based meeting apps, or even use your breakroom screens or message boards to play fun safety reminder videos. Messages that everyone sees become a shared experience and increase the sense of community.

icon of a training presentation

Comprehend–Keep the Information Flowing

Communication may be the most powerful tool in your arsenal when it comes to motivating workers. Nobody likes to be left in the dark. Modeling calm information sharing gives employees a sense that they know what’s going on and that they have the opportunity to contribute.

  • Maintain Your Training – it can be tempting to minimize training time right now since it’s hard to get people together in one space. But it’s a better idea to increase training during times of crisis when procedures may need to change, and stressed workers may be more distracted.
  • Assign Mentors to New Employees – deputize some of your veteran workers to look out for the newbies. It allows more experienced workers to deliver safety messages in person along with advice and information.
  • Host an Expert – if workers are struggling with feeling safe in the workplace as a result of COVID-19, consider asking a medical doctor to give a remote or socially distanced talk where workers can ask questions and separate fact from fiction.

icon of a head with a heart to symbolize mental health

Defend–Eliminate Uncertainty Where You Can

The word defend usually conjures up mental images of war. But on the job, it refers to feeling that one’s job is secure and won’t be taken away on a whim.

  • Empower Workers – provide a sense of empowerment by assigning a point person to be in charge of the safety of each work area, including any new protocols for limiting germ spread.
  • Avoid Surprises – whenever possible, if something is changing, make sure everyone knows about it in advance and knows why it’s happening. Even if you have bad news, it’s almost always better to be up front than to let the gossip start.
  • Create a Psychologically Healthy Workplace – ill health isn’t all about the virus. With so much stress and uncertainty, it’s easy for people’s mental health to slip too. Send a clear message that you’re there for your employees and that they can come to you or to your HR Department for help with problems. A little mindfulness and caring today may avoid an accident tomorrow.
Shadow

Get the tools you need to motivate workers, no matter where they are!

 

PPE: Choosing & Using

See All

New Innovations In Impact Protection

In the past, protecting your workers from impact, crush, and pinch hazards meant requiring them to wear bulky gloves covered in a thick polymer like TPR (Thermo Plastic Rubber). But while these gloves offered valuable protection, they tended to be stiff, oversized, and hot – tempting uncomfortable workers to take them off.

The good news is that recent years have brought impact gloves with new designs and features that keep workers both comfortable and protected. Are you still using yesterday’s impact gloves?
Read More

By M.B. Sutherland, Sr. Copywriter, Magid

Is It Time To Dump Your Old Impact Gloves?

In the past, protecting your workers from impact, crush, and pinch hazards meant requiring them to wear bulky gloves covered in a thick polymer like TPR (Thermo Plastic Rubber). But while these gloves offered valuable protection, they tended to be stiff, oversized, and hot – tempting uncomfortable workers to take them off.

The good news is that recent years have brought impact gloves with new designs and features that keep workers both comfortable and protected. Are you still using yesterday’s impact gloves?

Impact Gloves for Heavy-Duty Jobs

Work on construction sites, oil rigs, and in other heavy-duty industries still requires gloves with a thicker, impact-resistant polymer. But manufacturers have found innovative ways to get that TPR to move and breathe, keeping workers more comfortable and compliant.

Yesterday's Glove

  • Stiff and Bulky:

    Early-design impact gloves are wrapped in a single piece of thick TPR across the back of the hand and over the fingers. Pre-curved fingers on some designs help to reduce hand fatigue, but the gloves are often still stiff, bulky, and awkward to work in.
  • Steamy and Sweaty:

    When you think of a classic impact glove, you probably picture a leather shell with that same hot slab of TPR.

Today's Glove

TRX743S
TRX743
 
  • Flexible:

    Newer impact gloves are made to move naturally with your hand. Workers are still protected with TPR, but instead of a solid slab, it’s broken up with flex points to allow hands to move naturally. The versatile Windstorm Series® impact protection contains 130 integrated flex points.
  • Cooler with More Airflow:

    New designs may still feature a leather palm, but include a special mesh back and vented TPR to allow more airflow to make the gloves even cooler and lighter.
TRX685-S
TRX685
 
  • More Dexterity:

    New impact gloves feature AeroDex® specially engineered yarn that provide dexterity and comfort even at high cut levels. AeroDex® is also engineered to make your workers’ hands feel cooler than comparable cut-resistant gloves, further improving worker compliance.
TRX443-XS
TRX443
 

Impact Resistant Gloves for Lighter Duty Jobs

Jobs like light construction, I&E (instrumentation & electrical), maintenance, assembly, or tool work carry a risk of impact injuries including scrapes, bumps, and bruises. Since standard impact protection can be a little too much for jobs like these, manufacturers created impact gloves with low-profile, ultra lean TPR. These gloves deflect and absorb impacts while remaining flexible and light to prevent hand fatigue.

Impact Work Gloves to Fit All Your Needs

Older impact glove designs offer limited attributes and frequently lack specific features you need to keep your workers safe. Versatile designs and new technologies mean you can match the glove to the job. So whether you need a warmer impact glove for winter, a waterproof glove, different palm coatings, cut resistance, a special liner, or even a welder’s glove with flame-resistant TPR – you can find an impact glove to meet your needs. Some gloves even have reinforcements like thumb saddles or extra TPR at pinch points for applications that are hard on a particular area of the hand.

shadow

If “yesterday’s glove” sounds like what’s in your tool crib, take a look at the next generation of impact glove protection!

 

Protective Eyewear That Workers Want to Wear

Nobody likes a poke in the eye. But any safety manager can tell you how maddeningly often they go into their facility or onto a job site and find workers and even sometimes visitors without their eye protection. Proper training and frequent reminders go a long way toward keeping everyone safe. But it’s important to tackle the problem from the workers’ perspective.
Read More

By M.B. Sutherland, Sr. Copywriter, Magid

Nobody likes a poke in the eye. But any safety manager can tell you how maddeningly often they go into their facility or onto a job site and find workers and even sometimes visitors without their eye protection. Proper training and frequent reminders go a long way toward keeping everyone safe. But it’s important to tackle the problem from the workers’ perspective.

WORKERS TEND TO AVOID EYE PROTECTION FOR THREE REASONS:

1. COMFORT 2. USABILITY 3. PERSONAL PREFERENCE

COMFORT

Image of a worker holding a pair of safety glasses

If your safety glasses are pinching at the nose, rubbing behind the ears, or otherwise making you uncomfortable, it’s easy to take them off and leave them off. Even taking a moment to remove glasses to rub an irritated area can tempt fate. So if you want your workers to keep their safety glasses on every minute as they should, pay attention to comfort. Comfortable designs in eyewear provide cushioning at pressure points like the nose, forehead, and ears. Ratcheting temples help workers find their ideal fit and prevent glasses from gripping too hard and causing headaches.

USABILITY

Image of a worker wearing anti-fog safety glasses

Safety glasses can actually become a hazard if they fog up or slip down. Not only does it cause workers to remove their eyewear, but it can obstruct their vision. Anti-fog coatings keep glasses clear, so workers don’t need to take them off even in hot or humid environments. Non-slip nosepieces and elastic straps help to keep glasses in place, so they don’t slip down or off.

PERSONAL PREFERENCE

Image of a worker holding two pairs of safety glasses 

The days of clunky, unattractive safety glasses are long gone. Your workers now have a multitude of choices that look trendy and cool. So whether it’s clear indoor glasses or tinted outdoor shades, you can order a variety of styles and let your workers choose or get your workers involved in ordering and let them tell you what’s cool!

Choose safety glasses that your workers will want to wear and watch compliance issues disappear before your eyes! And don’t forget your employees with prescription safety eyewear needs. Be sure you have an RX eyewear program that works for you!

Choosing the Right Glove for Extreme Cut Hazards

Just a few years ago, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) cut levels ranged from 0 to 5, but the scale needed work. The range of gloves between Levels 4 and 5 was so broad that you could have two gloves with very different protection rated at the same level.
Read More

By M.B. Sutherland, Sr. Copywriter, Magid

Just a few years ago, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) cut levels ranged from 0 to 5, but the scale needed work. The range of gloves between Levels 4 and 5 was so broad that you could have two gloves with very different protection rated at the same level.

New ANSI Cut Level Standard

Image of a collage of different ANSI Cut Level shields

In 2016, the Institute came out with a new ANSI cut standard that used a different test and expanded the scale from A1 all the way through A9. With the new testing requirements, the old Levels 4 and 5 expanded significantly. These higher levels now cover a wide range of cut resistance and they make the ratings more precise and meaningful – so you can pinpoint the protection you need for an extreme cut hazard.

New Work Glove Technology, More Options

This is great news because the safety industry has since evolved to provide more glove options with higher cut levels than ever before. Now, industries that deal with very sharp edges or materials can find gloves to suit their needs.

 

Icon of a car


Automotive Manufacturing

 

 

Icon of a smokestack and a manufcaturing building


Manufacturing

 

 

Icon of an I-Beam


Metal Fabrication

 

 

Icon of a house


Household Appliance Assembly

 

 

Icon of an airplane


Aerospace Manufacturing

 

 

Icon of a pane of glass


Glass Fabrication

 

In the past, very high cut levels were only achievable by weaving steel wire into gloves, which took away from comfort and dexterity. Innovative technology including new methods of yarn wrapping and specialized core materials allow manufacturers to make gloves with high levels of cut protection that are still soft and comfortable. These new gloves are also available with different palm coatings to make them more versatile for dry, wet, and oily environments. These palm coatings provide excellent grip as well as touchscreen compatibility if your workers use electronic devices, too.

Image of a pair of cut level A7 palm-coated work gloves

 

New glove materials, like those in the AeroDex line, are 50% lighter than traditional HPPE of the same cut level and deliver tactile sensitivity for any job. In addition to being cool, lightweight and agile, the latest AeroDex model possesses a reinforced thumb saddle for extra protection at a critical wear point.

If it’s been a while since you reviewed your glove choices for extreme cut hazards, take another look. There might be a new glove out there that will keep your workers safer and more comfortable.

Experience the lightest cut resistance for yourself!

 

Tips to Avoid the High Price of Disposable PPE

Everything you do is about keeping people healthy and well. But unpredictable times may require new solutions to keep everyone safe without disrupting your company’s bottom line. The price explosion in disposable gloves and clothing is a good example of an area that could use some creative thinking.
Read More
By M.B. Sutherland, Sr. Copywriter, Magid

Everything you do is about keeping people healthy and well. But unpredictable times may require new solutions to keep everyone safe without disrupting your company’s bottom line. The price explosion in disposable gloves and clothing is a good example of an area that could use some creative thinking.

Shadow

Why Are Disposable PPE Prices So High?

The disposable PPE market has experienced what could be called a perfect storm of issues since early 2020. Rubber trees, which are the natural source of materials like nitrile and latex, only grow in hot, tropical climates. Because of this, single-use nitrile and latex gloves are exported almost entirely from the two countries that have developed a significant rubber trade - China and Malaysia.

The steep increase in the need for disposable gloves due to COVID-19, combined with the toll the virus took on these source countries caused shutdowns followed by a slow, gradual return to production. As the world continues to struggle with the virus, these materials also continue to be less available than ever before and that has caused prices to skyrocket as much as 340%, with some items increasing as much as 1,200%. If buyers don’t “bid up” and pay the increased prices, the materials go to higher bidders. In many cases, cash buyers jump ahead of the line to buy as much stock as they can in order to resell it at exorbitant prices.

To make matters worse for both industrial end-users and consumers, all disposable glove suppliers are in the same situation. So customers can’t simply move on to another company to find a better price. Instead, prices are in constant flux as buyers are forced to agree to pay market price upon shipment, no matter what the price was when they initially placed an order. This situation is expected to last at least through 2021.

Disposable PPE that Costs Less

Fortunately, you do have some options that are worth exploring. Start by reviewing the disposable gloves and garments you’re used to buying.

Disposable Gloves

Disposable gloves have different issues depending on what you use. Nitrile is a common type of disposable glove that many companies switched to when latex allergies became more common. As of this writing, nitrile glove prices are the most volatile due to the shortage of raw materials. These are the gloves experiencing the incredible, sometimes over 1,000%, increases in price.

Material Substitutes –
Start by reviewing all the nitrile glove applications in your facility to see if you might be able to use an alternative without affecting your processes or safety.


  • Vinyl Gloves – prices have not increased dramatically, but there has been a huge uptick in demand for these gloves, making it harder to find a reliable supply.
  • Latex Gloves – prices are also steady, but it may be harder to find variations in these gloves as manufacturers are reducing sku’s and in some cases, making as few as just one type and size of glove so they can make large amounts without switching machines and materials to provide variation.
  • Powdered Gloves – powdered gloves of all types are harder to get as suppliers try to simplify their production lines. An alternative possibility for those who need powdered is to buy regular gloves and supply glove dust in your facility to add where needed, if you can do so safely.
  • Material Blends – some gloves are made with a blend of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and nitrile to create a less expensive glove that performs the same as a full nitrile glove. These gloves are less expensive than traditional nitrile, but may be harder to find.

Disposable Garments

Disposable garment supplies pose different challenges depending on what you buy. While garments made of high-density polyethylene are not significantly more expensive right now, they are harder to get since they come from just one large U.S. supplier that is struggling to keep up with the increased demand in the pandemic.

Material Substitutes –

  • Consider disposable garments that are made of Spunbound Meltblown Spunbound (SMS) polypropylene. The name sounds repetitive and so is the material, which is made of one layer of spunbound polypropylene, a middle layer of meltblown polypropylene, and a third layer of spunbond polypropylene. Both SMS and high-density polyethylene materials perform similarly, but SMS materials are made by more than one manufacturer, so it’s easier to find.
Shadow

Alternatives to Disposable Gloves

Depending on your work environment and application, you may also be able to save significantly on costs by moving away from disposable gloves entirely. The advent of thinner, more dexterous knit glove shells along with improvements in liquid and oil-resistant glove coatings provide gloves that offer an alternative to single-use disposables for barrier protection. These gloves start out more expensive per pair, but with reuse and laundering, cost savings on the life of a glove can be significant.

While it may seem counterintuitive to go from relatively cheap disposables to more expensive multiple-use gloves, the benefits and cost savings become obvious when you compare attributes and total cost of ownership. This table compares disposable nitrile gloves to Magid’s specially coated general purpose knit gloves.

Image of a knit glove

  Disposable Nitrile Glove Lightweight Work Glove with TriTek Palm Coating
Glove Attributes Liquid protection only. No specialized grip or abrasion resistance. Advanced Oil Grip. Minimizes saturation in heavy liquid and oil and provides high abrasion resistance.
Non-breathable. Traps sweat and can lead to skin irritation. Breathable. Allows sweat to evaporate and reduces irritation.
Single use. Workers go through multiple gloves each day. Reusable. Machine-washable shell lasts 20x longer than disposable, so workers can go days, weeks, or even months with the same pair.
Rising, unpredictable cost and supply. Reasonable cost, no supply issues.
Total Cost of Ownership based on 1,000 Employees Cost per pair: $0.31   Cost per pair: $2.80  
Monthly pairs per employee: 172   Monthly pairs per employee: 6  
  Annualized Spend: $639,840   Annualized Spend: $201,600
    68% Cost Savings
Shadow

Alternative to Double-Gloving

Image of coated work gloves

Coated work gloves are also a good alternative if you’re using disposale gloves as a moisture liner under a cut-resistant glove. Cut-resistant, knit work gloves are now available in both palm coated and ¾ coated gloves to keep hands dry and comfortable without the need for double gloving.

Shadow

Necessity is the Mother of Invention

While reusable gloves are not always viable for some applications like medical and foodservice use, industrial applications may find them to be a valuable alternative that saves you both money and the hassle of chasing inventory.

Safety Managers' Secrets

See All

Give a Safety Pop Quiz

I like to give my workers random safety pop quizzes for a prize. For example, I’ll ask if anyone can recite at least five of our ten safety protocols. If they can, they get a t-shirt.
Read More

I like to give my workers random safety pop quizzes for a prize. For example, I’ll ask if anyone can recite at least five of our ten safety protocols. If they can, they get a t-shirt.

Have a Company "Ice Cream Man"

As a Texas-based refinery company, we have workers scattered over a large area working in the field. It can be hard to keep them hydrated and cool in the scorching summer heat. We assigned a company “ice cream man” who drove around from site to site with frozen electrolyte pops. The guys are always happy to see the truck coming their way and excited to get a little something to cool them down!
Read More

As a Texas-based refinery company, we have workers scattered over a large area working in the field. It can be hard to keep them hydrated and cool in the scorching summer heat. We assigned a company “ice cream man” who drove around from site to site with frozen electrolyte pops. The guys are always happy to see the truck coming their way and excited to get a little something to cool them down!

Eyes on Safety

I walk around the facility carrying ping pong balls with eyes on them. Whenever workers aren’t wearing their safety glasses – I give them an “eye” as a friendly reminder to put on their gear. It’s a fun way to enforce safety.
Read More

I walk around the facility carrying ping pong balls with eyes on them. Whenever workers aren’t wearing their safety glasses – I give them an “eye” as a friendly reminder to put on their gear. It’s a fun way to enforce safety.

Take PPE Home

We encourage our workers to take their PPE home with them so they can implement their safety training outside of work. We are proud to have so many employees who take safety seriously in all aspects of their lives. We had an employee who experienced a laceration incident at home. He was wearing his PPE when it happened and it saved him from what would have been a severed finger. While he has always known that the proper PPE is key to staying safe and in one piece, he says he’s a true believer now. That experience helped reinforce for him the importance of the proper safety equipment. After all, gloves are cheaper than stitches!
Read More

We encourage our workers to take their PPE home with them so they can implement their safety training outside of work. We are proud to have so many employees who take safety seriously in all aspects of their lives. We had an employee who experienced a laceration incident at home. He was wearing his PPE when it happened and it saved him from what would have been a severed finger. While he has always known that the proper PPE is key to staying safe and in one piece, he says he’s a true believer now. That experience helped reinforce for him the importance of the proper safety equipment. After all, gloves are cheaper than stitches!